• Indian Creek Spring

    Angie Point

  • Main Street 2007

    Jan Boles

  • Indepnedence Day 2016

    Kids on Parade

  • Historic Caldwell Home

    Jan Boles

  • Cardboard Kayak Race

    Ken Wien

  • Winter Wonderland

    Jan Boles 11-26-17

  • Winter Wonderland Lights

    Michelle Chadd 2017

News

  • Caldwell, partners launch 'We the Family' campaign

    August 31, 2018; by Savanah Cardon scardon@idahopress.com. Caldwell -- The city of Caldwell and its partners have launched a campaign called We the Family to help connect families with . . . (click the title to read the full article)

    9/4/2018 9:32:17 AM

  • Caldwell Fire Dept promotes Ives and Kerbs; hires Fire Prevention Officer Stewart

    Caldwell, Idaho July 16, 2018: Caldwell Fire Chief Mark Wendelsdorf has announced the promotion of Firfighter Jacob Ives and Firefighter Kolby Kerbs to Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator, effective June 10, 2018 . . . . (for the rest of the story, click on the story title)

    8/31/2018 12:39:52 PM

  • Caldwell's 7.3 million Indian Creek Plaza opens next week

    CALDWELL — After more than a year of construction and years of planning, the wait for the highly anticipated Indian Creek Plaza, Caldwell’s newest 57,000-square-foot downtown urban square, is close to an end. As a new downtown destination for . . . (click on the title to read the full IPT article)

    7/6/2018 2:23:41 PM

More News

Fire Prevention Week October 7-13, 2018

This year’s FPW campaign, “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere,” works to educate people about three basic but essential steps to take to reduce the likelihood of having a fire––and how to escape safely in the event of one:

LOOK
Look for places fire could start. Take a good look around your home. Identify potential fire hazards and take care of them.

LISTEN
Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm. You could have only minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Go to your outside meeting place, which should be a safe distance from the home and where everyone should know to meet.

LEARN
Learn two ways out of every room and make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily and are free of clutter.

Also, Sparky the Fire Dog® has a new friend, Simon, who is helping teach this year’s FPW messages – He’s a smart, resourceful character who will join Sparky in spreading fire-safety messages to adults and children alike.


Installing Smoke Alarms

Smoke Alarm Recall 

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips:

  • CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards. For the best protection, interconnect all CO alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for placement and mounting height.
  • Choose a CO alarm that has the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
  • Call your local fire department’s non-emergency number to find out what number to call if the CO alarm sounds.
  • Test CO alarms at least once a month; replace them according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries. If the battery is low, replace it. If it still sounds, call the fire department.
  • If the CO alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. Make sure everyone inside the home is accounted for. Call for help from a fresh air location and stay there until emergency personnel.
  • If you need to warm a vehicle, remove it from the garage immediately after starting it. Do not run a vehicle or other fueled engine or motor indoors, even if garage doors are open. Make sure the exhaust pipe of a running vehicle is not covered with snow.
  • During and after a snowstorm, make sure vents for the dryer, furnace, stove, and fireplace are clear of snow build-up.
  • A generator should be used in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.
  • Gas or charcoal grills can produce CO — only use outside.